The Other Austen

Guaranteed to Bring Out the Bitch In You

  • 3rd April
    2014
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  • 1st April
    2014
  • 01
  • 31st March
    2014
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  • 25th March
    2014
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  • 18th March
    2014
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  • 25th February
    2014
  • 25
beatonna:

"Henry the 5th
This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”
15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

beatonna:

"Henry the 5th

This Prince after he succeeded to the throne grew quite reformed and amiable, forsaking all his dissipated Companions, & never thrashing Sir William again. During his reign, Lord Cobham was burnt alive, but I forget what for. His Majesty then turned his thoughts to France, where he went & fought the famous Battle of Agincourt. He afterwards married the King’s daughter Catherine, a very agreeable Woman by Shakespear’s account. Inspite of all this however, he died, and was succeeded by his son Henry.”

15 year old Jane writes English History.  A reader sent me this one, it’s really great.  Click through the image.

(via redscrunchieofpower)

  • 24th February
    2014
  • 24
  • 18th February
    2014
  • 18

fangirlquest:

Miniseries: Pride and Prejudice
Location: Lacock, UK (on Google map)

Wow, the cutest little village ever! It’s a bit of a ride if you don’t live anywhere close, but if the weather is fine and you simply need to get away from it all, this is the perfect place to visit. They even filmed some Harry Potter here!

Lacock has a huge, beautiful Abbey you can visit, too.

You can find more information on National Trust’s website.

If you like our sceneframing photos, you can check out all the other tv shows and movies we’ve covered so far, and support our crowdfunding campaign

(via fuckyeahjaneites)

  • 17th February
    2014
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  • 15th February
    2014
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  • 7th February
    2014
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  • 4th February
    2014
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erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!
A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.
Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!

A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.

Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

(via studiorobin)

  • 2nd February
    2014
  • 02

misseffie:

In other news: Jane Austen rises from her grave to claim that she regrets Mr Darcy and Elizabeth ending up together. “Mr Wickham was probs the way to go." Fandom is shocked and confused.

(via redlippedladyofrohan)